What is inflammation and how is it related to obesity?

What are the issues one could face when encountered with inflammation?

Inflammation induced by obesity represents a focused and rapid response to a site of injury or infection by the innate immune system, which is responsible for fighting new infections. However, unlike the defensive inflammatory response that fights off an infection, the inflammation marked by obesity does not resolve and, without intervention, can become chronic.

There are two types of inflammation; the first is acute inflammation that lasts for a short time and the second one is chronic inflammation that lasts for a long time and is characterised by the presence of white blood cells and the proliferation of blood vessels and connective tissue.

Our immune system is designed to protect us against new infections. Having obesity, however, causes this reaction to be even more rapid. In addition to fighting off the temporary infection, high fat deposits make this a chronic condition permanent that persists in the body. Even in the absence of infection, the organs are destroyed for a long time without any reason.

A chronic inflammatory state is responsible for chronic diseases such as diabetes, hypertension, and heart disease. Inflammation caused by obesity represents a focused and rapid response to a site of injury or infection by the innate immune system, which is responsible for fighting new infections. However, unlike the defensive inflammatory response that fights off an infection, the inflammation marked by obesity does not resolve and, without intervention, can become chronic.

Obesity is considered a characteristic feature of metabolic syndrome (the medical term for a combination of diabetes, high blood pressure (hypertension) and obesity). The link between them has been attributed to the inflammatory process. Inflammation knocks the body out of balance. A healthy and balanced lifestyle is key to returning the body back to health and equilibrium.

Inflammation is often associated with excess fat. Additionally, it can disrupt your body’s hunger signalling by causing hormonal changes. As a result, one may feel hungry even when they do not need food.

To summarise inflammation in a nutshell, what exactly is it?

Think of a wound that swells up, turns red, and hurts. Inflammation may be the cause. Inflammation is generally the body’s immune system’s reaction to an irritant. Frequently, the irritation is caused by germs; however, it can also be caused by foreign objects, such as splinters.

Multiple factors can cause inflammation, including;

  • Pathogens (germs) like bacteria, viruses or fungi
  • External injuries like scrapes or damage through foreign objects (for example a thorn in your finger)
  • Effects of chemicals or radiations

Diseases or medical conditions that cause inflammation often have a name ending in “-itis.” For example:

  • Bronchitis: an inflammation of the bronchi
  • Otitis media: an inflammation of the middle ear
  • Dermatitis: a disease where the skin is inflamed

Obesity can also cause underlying inflammation that may not be shown out as a symptom.

Breaking the cycle of obesity and inflammation is difficult, but not impossible. Consult a weight loss professional in such cases. It is important to keep your body composition at an optimal level to stay fit and healthy. As a result, you will be able to live a longer life by keeping inflammation under control.

The Progenmethod focuses on reducing your excess fat mass and preserving muscle mass at the same time. In turn, this reduces the risks associated with obesity.

Here we not only focus on getting you to reach your target weight, but of how every component changes in your body throughout the process. We do this a structured vlck diet followed by a 2 year long maintenance period so that your body both loses excess fat and maintains the lost weight. By doing this, our clients keep their inflammation in check and have shown to be more immune to diseases and have better stamina after they reach their target weight.

Sources: (1) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK279298/     
Cologne, Germany: Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG); 2006-.             (2)https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5507106/#:~:text=The%20excess%20of%20macronutrients%20in,inflammatory%20state%20and%20oxidative%20stress.

Ellulu, M. S., Patimah, I., Khaza’ai, H., Rahmat, A., & Abed, Y. (2017). Obesity and inflammation: the linking mechanism and the complications. Archives of medical science : AMS, 13(4), 851–863. https://doi.org/10.5114/aoms.2016.58928

Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn
Pinterest
    WhatsApp WhatsApp us